May Gardening Reminders

Planting
Plant heat-loving annuals including copper plant, firebush, gomphrena, lantana, pentas, purple fountaingrass and ornamental sweet potato in sunny areas. Buy “hardened” plants that are acclimated to sun.
In shady spots, plant caladium and elephant ear bulbs, begonias, coleus, impatiens (mildew-resistant types).
Seeds of celosia, cosmos, marigold, morning glory, portulaca and zinnia can be sown directly in the beds. Keep seeded area moist until seeds germinate. Achimenes, cannas, dahlias and other summer flowering bulbs can also be planted in May.
Establish new lawns before summer heat sets in. Sow seeded varieties of Bermudagrass early in the month; or sod Bermuda or St. Augustine grass. Water daily for first few weeks to develop a good root system.
Fertilizing and Pruning
Manually thin the fruit on peaches, pears, plums and apples to 5-6 inches apart early in the month.
Fertilize tomatoes and most other vegetables every other week for productive and vigorous plants.
Prune spring-flowering shrubs and vines soon after flowering. Keep the natural shape of the plant in mind as you prune, and avoid excessive cutting except where necessary to control size. Deadhead roses and other reblooming plants.
Feed fruit trees, perennials, annuals, ground covers and vines with a lawn fertilizer (3-1-2 or 4-1-2 ratio).
Allow foliage of daffodils and other spring-flowering bulbs to mature and yellow before removing.
Garden Watch
Allow bluebonnets and other reseeding, annual wildflowers to die and the seeds to dry before mowing the stubble. Delay mowing until end of growing season if other wildflowers are growing in the area.
Maintain a 2-3 inch layer of shredded hardwood or other wood mulch in beds and around all plants to conserve moisture and reduce weeds.
Check tomatoes for signs of early blight (yellow blotches on lower leaves). Apply a labeled fungicide if needed. Keep soil adequately moist to prevent blossom-end rot (browned tissue on bloom end of fruit).
Look for squash bugs in early morning. Destroy eggs found on underside of leaves by hand. Vegetable pests can often be controlled by mechanical, biological or organic means rather than by chemicals.
Watch for bagworms on junipers and other narrow-leafed evergreens. Apply Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) or general insecticide at first sign of larvae feeding. Remember that once the bag has formed, your only option is to manually pull them off.
Make initial application of Image® or SedgeHammer 5 to control nutsedge (or “nutgrass”) in
established warm-season lawns.

The Shumard Oak is a large, deciduous tree reaching heights of 120 feet and a width of 50-60 feet. The Shumard Oak tolerates full sun and low to medium water requirements. This Texas native produces acorns eaten by wildlife. The Shumard Oak is a fast growing tree with orange to deep red fall color. Oak wilt can be a disease problem.

The CBMGA Annual Plant Sale and Expo is the first weekend in May. Come by, get a bargain, learn some stuff, get some more plants.

 

Asterisk (*) means transplant vegetable starter plants. For
seeds, start 2-3 weeks earlier
Crop Spring
Planting Date
Fall
Planting Date
Seed or Plants
Per 100 ft of Row
Inches
Between
Number of
Days Before
Average Yield
Per 100 Feet
Average Days of Harvest
Asparagus 2/1 to 3/1 Not Rec. 1 ounce 18 730 30 pounds 60
Cabbage* 2/1 to 3/1 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 60 to 90 150 pounds 40
Garlic 2/1 to 3/1 9/1 to 10/15 1 pound 2 to 4 140 to 150 40 pounds
Kohlrabi 2/1 to 3/1 8/15 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 4 to 6 55 to 75 75 pounds 14
Onion (plants) 2/1 to 3/1 Not Rec. 400 to 600 plants 2 to 3 80 to 120 100 pounds 40
Peas, English 2/1 to 3/1 8/15 to 9/15 1 pound 1 55 to 90 20 pounds 7
Spinach 2/1 to 3/1 9/1 to 10/15 1 ounce 3 to 4 40 to 60 3 bushels 40
Turnip 2/1 to 3/1 9/15 to 10/15 1/2 ounce 2 to 3 30 to 60 75 pounds 35
Beets 2/1 to 4/1 9/1 to 10/1 1 ounce 2 50 to 60 150 pounds 30
Radish 2/1 to 4/1 9/15 to 10/15 1 ounce 1 25 to 40 100 bunches 7
Carrots 2/10 to 3/1 8/1 to 10/1 1/2 ounce 2 70 to 80 100 pounds 21
Collard / Kale 2/10 to 3/1 8/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 8 to 16 50 to 80 100 pounds 60
Potatoes, Irish 2/15 to 3/1 8/1 to 9/1 6 to 10 pounds 10 to 15 75 to 100 100 pounds
Cabbage, Chinese * 2/15 to 3/10 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 8 to 12 65 to 70 80 pounds 21
Lettuce 2/15 to 3/15 9/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 2 to 3 40 to 80 50 pounds 21
Broccoli * 3/1 to 3/15 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 60 to 80 100 pounds 40
Cauliflower * 3/1 to 3/15 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 70 to 90 100 pounds 14
Muskmelon 3/15 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 36 85 to 100 100 fruit 30
Chard, Swiss 3/20 to 4/15 8/1 to 10/1 2 ounces 6 45 to 55 75 pounds 40
Squash, Summer 3/20 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/15 1 ounce 18 to 36 50 to 60 150 pounds 40
Cucumber 4/1 to 4/15 8/1 to 9/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 28 50 to 70 120 pounds 30
Eggplant * 4/1 to 4/15 7/15 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 24 80 to 90 100 pounds 90
Squash, Winter 4/1 to 4/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 48 85 to 100 100 pounds
Tomato (plants) 4/1 to 4/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 36 70 to 90 100 pounds 40
Beans, Bush 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/2 pound 3 to 4 45 to 60 120 pounds 14
Beans, Pole 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/2 pound 4 to 6 60 to 70 150 pounds 30
Beans, Lima 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/4 pound 3 to 4 80 50 pounds 40
Corn, Sweet 4/1 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/1 3 to 4 ounces 12 to 18 70 to 90 10 dozen ears 10
Mustard 4/1 to 5/1 7/10 to 9/1 1/4 ounce 6 to 12 30 to 40 100 pounds 30
Potatoes, Sweet 4/1 to 5/15 Not Rec. 75 to 100 plants 12 to 16 100 to 130 100 pounds
Watermelon 4/1 to 5/15 7/1 to 7/15 1/2 ounce 36 to 96 80 to 100 40 fruits 30
Pepper 4/10 to 5/1 7/1 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 24 60 to 90 60 pounds 90
Pumpkin 4/15 to 5/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 36 to 48 75 to 100 100 pounds
Peas, Southern 4/15 to 6/1 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 pound 4 to 6 60 to 70 40 pounds 30
Watermelon 4/15 to 6/1 7/1 to 7/15 1/2 ounce 36 to 96 75 to 100 40 fruits 30
Okra 4/15 to 7/1 Not Rec. 2 ounces 24 55 to 65 100 pounds 90
Brussel Sprouts Not Rec. 8/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 90 to 100 75 pounds 21
Parsley Not Rec. 8/10 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 2 to 4 70 to 90 30 pounds 90

 

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