February Gardening Reminders

Planting

    • Cool-season vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale and potatoes should be planted mid-month or about 4 weeks prior to the average last freeze date (March 29 in Titus County).
    Beets, carrots, lettuce, radishes, spinach, Swiss chard and “greens” (collard, mustard and turnip) should be planted 2 to 4 weeks prior to the average last freeze.(March 29 in Titus County)

    • Plant asparagus crowns in 10-12 inches of soil. When buying crowns, look for 2-year old root systems with healthy roots.

    • Container and bare-root roses can be planted now. When planting from a container, use a two-gallon or larger size. Consider Texas A&M Earth-Kind® varieties which are easy to maintain and need less water, fertilizer and pesticides. For more information on these special roses, go to http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/earthkindroses®.

    • When buying plants, biggest is not always best, especially with bare-root plants. Small to medium sizes establish faster.
    Dig and divide warm-season perennials (cannas, coneflowers, perennial salvia, mums) before they break dormancy.

Fertilizing and Pruning

    Prune bush roses around Valentine’s Day. Prune old, dead and weak canes back to the ground. Leave 4 to 8 vigorous canes, removing one-half of their growth above an outward-facing bud. Wait to prune climbing or leaning roses until after they bloom. Prune errant canes at any time to maintain desired shape.

    Herbaceous perennials and ornamental grasses may be cut back now. Prune autumn sage {Salvia gregii) by 50%. Mexican feather grass does not require pruning.

    Dig and divide large clumps of warm-season ornamental grasses especially if the center of the plant has died.
    Cut or mow liriope before new growth emerges. Asian jasmine may be trimmed back to 4 or 5 inches.

Garden Watch

    • Begin controlling insects and diseases on fruit and nut trees. Spraying is essential for a successful harvest. Contact the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service – Titus County for a copy of the “Homeowners Fruit and Nut Spray Schedule”.

    • Look for aphids and caterpillars on vegetables, and control with insecticidal soap and Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis), respectively.
    Check for scale insects adhering to the trunk, branches and leaves of hollies, euonymus, shade trees, pecans, fruit trees and other woody plants. Apply horticultural oil (or “dormant” oil) to control these and other over-wintering insects.

    Inspect the lawn sprinkler system to ensure proper operation. Replace worn or broken sprinkler heads. Adjust spray patterns to reduce runoff.

The Little Gem Magnolia is an evergreen tree reaching a height of 15-20 feet and a width of 8-10 feet. The Little Gem Magnolia will tolerate full to partial sun and low water needs, its ornate, large flowers are white and creamy with a sweet fragrance. The dark, glossy, green leaves provide a nice contrast to the beautiful flowers that bloom for several months.

Asterisk (*) means transplant vegetable starter plants. For
seeds, start 2-3 weeks earlier
Crop Spring
Planting Date
Fall
Planting Date
Seed or Plants
Per 100 ft of Row
Inches
Between
Number of
Days Before
Average Yield
Per 100 Feet
Average Days of Harvest
Asparagus 2/1 to 3/1 Not Rec. 1 ounce 18 730 30 pounds 60
Cabbage* 2/1 to 3/1 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 60 to 90 150 pounds 40
Garlic 2/1 to 3/1 9/1 to 10/15 1 pound 2 to 4 140 to 150 40 pounds
 
Kohlrabi 2/1 to 3/1 8/15 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 4 to 6 55 to 75 75 pounds 14
Onion (plants) 2/1 to 3/1 Not Rec. 400 to 600 plants 2 to 3 80 to 120 100 pounds 40
Peas, English 2/1 to 3/1 8/15 to 9/15 1 pound 1 55 to 90 20 pounds 7
Spinach 2/1 to 3/1 9/1 to 10/15 1 ounce 3 to 4 40 to 60 3 bushels 40
Turnip 2/1 to 3/1 9/15 to 10/15 1/2 ounce 2 to 3 30 to 60 75 pounds 35
Beets 2/1 to 4/1 9/1 to 10/1 1 ounce 2 50 to 60 150 pounds 30
Radish 2/1 to 4/1 9/15 to 10/15 1 ounce 1 25 to 40 100 bunches 7
Carrots 2/10 to 3/1 8/1 to 10/1 1/2 ounce 2 70 to 80 100 pounds 21
Collard / Kale 2/10 to 3/1 8/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 8 to 16 50 to 80 100 pounds 60
Potatoes, Irish 2/15 to 3/1 8/1 to 9/1 6 to 10 pounds 10 to 15 75 to 100 100 pounds
 
Cabbage, Chinese * 2/15 to 3/10 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 8 to 12 65 to 70 80 pounds 21
Lettuce 2/15 to 3/15 9/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 2 to 3 40 to 80 50 pounds 21
Broccoli * 3/1 to 3/15 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 60 to 80 100 pounds 40
Cauliflower * 3/1 to 3/15 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 70 to 90 100 pounds 14
Muskmelon 3/15 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 36 85 to 100 100 fruit 30
Chard, Swiss 3/20 to 4/15 8/1 to 10/1 2 ounces 6 45 to 55 75 pounds 40
Squash, Summer 3/20 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/15 1 ounce 18 to 36 50 to 60 150 pounds 40
Cucumber 4/1 to 4/15 8/1 to 9/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 28 50 to 70 120 pounds 30
Eggplant * 4/1 to 4/15 7/15 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 24 80 to 90 100 pounds 90
Squash, Winter 4/1 to 4/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 48 85 to 100 100 pounds
 
Tomato (plants) 4/1 to 4/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 36 70 to 90 100 pounds 40
Beans, Bush 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/2 pound 3 to 4 45 to 60 120 pounds 14
Beans, Pole 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/2 pound 4 to 6 60 to 70 150 pounds 30
Beans, Lima 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/4 pound 3 to 4 80 50 pounds 40
Corn, Sweet 4/1 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/1 3 to 4 ounces 12 to 18 70 to 90 10 dozen ears 10
Mustard 4/1 to 5/1 7/10 to 9/1 1/4 ounce 6 to 12 30 to 40 100 pounds 30
Potatoes, Sweet 4/1 to 5/15 Not Rec. 75 to 100 plants 12 to 16 100 to 130 100 pounds
 
Watermelon 4/1 to 5/15 7/1 to 7/15 1/2 ounce 36 to 96 80 to 100 40 fruits 30
Pepper 4/10 to 5/1 7/1 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 24 60 to 90 60 pounds 90
Pumpkin 4/15 to 5/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 36 to 48 75 to 100 100 pounds
 
Peas, Southern 4/15 to 6/1 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 pound 4 to 6 60 to 70 40 pounds 30
Watermelon 4/15 to 6/1 7/1 to 7/15 1/2 ounce 36 to 96 75 to 100 40 fruits 30
Okra 4/15 to 7/1 Not Rec. 2 ounces 24 55 to 65 100 pounds 90
Brussel Sprouts Not Rec. 8/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 90 to 100 75 pounds 21
Parsley Not Rec. 8/10 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 2 to 4 70 to 90 30 pounds 90

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments are closed.