CBMGA July Gardening Reminders

Planting

  • Plant tomatoes and peppers from 4-inch pots. Visit http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/vegetable
    for recommended varieties.
  • Early July is the time to plant small and medium pumpkins for a Halloween harvest.
  • Plant heat-tolerant annuals that have been acclimated to hot, sunny conditions. This includes moss rose,
    purslane, trailing lantana, purple fountain grass, firebush and copper plants.
  • Lawn grasses can be planted this month, but you will need to water twice daily for short intervals to
    keep soil surface moist until the grass has established good roots, usually in two to three weeks.

Fertilizing and Pruning

  • Fertilize plants that bloom on new growth, such as crape myrtles, tropical hibiscus and roses, with a
    high-nitrogen fertilizer to promote late-summer growth and fall blooms. Apply same fertilizer to boost
    summer annuals and fall-flowering perennials.
  • Light pruning of erratic spring growth may be done to maintain the natural form. Dead and diseased
    wood from trees and shrubs should be removed. Major pruning should be postponed until mid-winter.
  • Deadhead all blooming plants. Remove dead leaves and spent blooms from container plants.

Garden Watch

  • Be a “plant health” detective! Plants respond in various ways to heat and drought stress. These
    symptoms are often misdiagnosed as an insect or disease problem. Correctly identify the problem
    before turning to a pesticide.
  • Galls on leaves of oaks, hackberries and other trees are caused by many species of gall-forming insects,
    and are result of the female stinging the leaf tissues as she lays her eggs. Galls are harmless since the
    insect doesn’t feed on plant tissues.
  • Be alert for summer drought conditions which could occur at any time now, leaving normally
    well-hydrated plants lacking sufficient water. If plants are still wilted the next morning, watering is needed.
    To improve water use efficiency in your landscape, visit http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/earthkind/publications/#water.
  • Watch for lawn pests. Dry, light-colored areas in sunny parts of St. Augustine are probably the result of
    chinch bugs (small black insects with white diamond on their backs). Apply Merit (imidoclopyrid) or other
    labeled insecticide. Grub worms are the culprits if the turf turns brown and easily comes up when pulled
    on. Treat with a granular insecticide.
  • Rapid death of established landscape plants and orchard trees during the summer may signify the
    presence of cotton root rot, a soil-borne fungal disease common in our calcareous clay soils.
    Since there is no effective control, verification by the Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab at Texas A&M (http://plantclinic.tamu.edu) will help you know what plants can be used as replacements.

The Crape Myrtle is considered a small tree but comes in many sizes and varieties. This deciduous tree
has moderate growth with low water needs. The Crape Myrtle provides profuse spikes of beautiful flowers
in many colors ranging from white, pink, purple or red that bloom throughout the summer. The tree also
features attractive, smooth, peeling bark. Crape Myrtle trees may have problems with aphids and
powdery mildew.

Asterisk (*) means transplant vegetable starter plants. For
seeds, start 2-3 weeks earlier
Crop Spring
Planting Date
Fall
Planting Date
Seed or Plants
Per 100 ft of Row
Inches
Between
Number of
Days Before
Average Yield
Per 100 Feet
Average Days of Harvest
Asparagus 2/1 to 3/1 Not Rec. 1 ounce 18 730 30 pounds 60
Cabbage* 2/1 to 3/1 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 60 to 90 150 pounds 40
Garlic 2/1 to 3/1 9/1 to 10/15 1 pound 2 to 4 140 to 150 40 pounds
Kohlrabi 2/1 to 3/1 8/15 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 4 to 6 55 to 75 75 pounds 14
Onion (plants) 2/1 to 3/1 Not Rec. 400 to 600 plants 2 to 3 80 to 120 100 pounds 40
Peas, English 2/1 to 3/1 8/15 to 9/15 1 pound 1 55 to 90 20 pounds 7
Spinach 2/1 to 3/1 9/1 to 10/15 1 ounce 3 to 4 40 to 60 3 bushels 40
Turnip 2/1 to 3/1 9/15 to 10/15 1/2 ounce 2 to 3 30 to 60 75 pounds 35
Beets 2/1 to 4/1 9/1 to 10/1 1 ounce 2 50 to 60 150 pounds 30
Radish 2/1 to 4/1 9/15 to 10/15 1 ounce 1 25 to 40 100 bunches 7
Carrots 2/10 to 3/1 8/1 to 10/1 1/2 ounce 2 70 to 80 100 pounds 21
Collard / Kale 2/10 to 3/1 8/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 8 to 16 50 to 80 100 pounds 60
Potatoes, Irish 2/15 to 3/1 8/1 to 9/1 6 to 10 pounds 10 to 15 75 to 100 100 pounds
Cabbage, Chinese * 2/15 to 3/10 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 8 to 12 65 to 70 80 pounds 21
Lettuce 2/15 to 3/15 9/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 2 to 3 40 to 80 50 pounds 21
Broccoli * 3/1 to 3/15 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 60 to 80 100 pounds 40
Cauliflower * 3/1 to 3/15 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 70 to 90 100 pounds 14
Muskmelon 3/15 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 36 85 to 100 100 fruit 30
Chard, Swiss 3/20 to 4/15 8/1 to 10/1 2 ounces 6 45 to 55 75 pounds 40
Squash, Summer 3/20 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/15 1 ounce 18 to 36 50 to 60 150 pounds 40
Cucumber 4/1 to 4/15 8/1 to 9/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 28 50 to 70 120 pounds 30
Eggplant * 4/1 to 4/15 7/15 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 24 80 to 90 100 pounds 90
Squash, Winter 4/1 to 4/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 48 85 to 100 100 pounds
Tomato (plants) 4/1 to 4/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 36 70 to 90 100 pounds 40
Beans, Bush 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/2 pound 3 to 4 45 to 60 120 pounds 14
Beans, Pole 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/2 pound 4 to 6 60 to 70 150 pounds 30
Beans, Lima 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/4 pound 3 to 4 80 50 pounds 40
Corn, Sweet 4/1 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/1 3 to 4 ounces 12 to 18 70 to 90 10 dozen ears 10
Mustard 4/1 to 5/1 7/10 to 9/1 1/4 ounce 6 to 12 30 to 40 100 pounds 30
Potatoes, Sweet 4/1 to 5/15 Not Rec. 75 to 100 plants 12 to 16 100 to 130 100 pounds
Watermelon 4/1 to 5/15 7/1 to 7/15 1/2 ounce 36 to 96 80 to 100 40 fruits 30
Pepper 4/10 to 5/1 7/1 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 24 60 to 90 60 pounds 90
Pumpkin 4/15 to 5/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 36 to 48 75 to 100 100 pounds
Peas, Southern 4/15 to 6/1 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 pound 4 to 6 60 to 70 40 pounds 30
Watermelon 4/15 to 6/1 7/1 to 7/15 1/2 ounce 36 to 96 75 to 100 40 fruits 30
Okra 4/15 to 7/1 Not Rec. 2 ounces 24 55 to 65 100 pounds 90
Brussel Sprouts Not Rec. 8/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 90 to 100 75 pounds 21
Parsley Not Rec. 8/10 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 2 to 4 70 to 90 30 pounds 90

 

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