April Gardening Reminders

Planting

  • Plant warm-season annual flowers. For sun (6+hours per day): angelonias, copper plants, firebush, lantana, moss rose, purslane, pentas, ornamental sweet potatoes and zinnias. For shade (less than 4 hours per day): begonias, coleus, impatiens and perilla. Select short, compact plants. Plant okra and southern peas (black-eyed peas, etc). Squash, cucumbers and melons can still be planted.
  • Many herbs can also be planted from transplants (for example: dill, parsley, fennel, mint, oregano and thyme).
  • Now is the best time to plant Bermudagrass and St. Augustine grass sod. Grade and smooth area prior to installing sod to ensure good soil contact. Keep moist until roots are established.
    Seeded varieties of Bermudagrass may be sown starting mid-month. Keep soil moist until seed germinate and grass has established a good root system.
  • Select caladium tubers now, while ample stocks are available, for May planting.

Pruning and Fertilizing

  • Apply a high-nitrogen fertilizer to established lawns. Use product containing at least half of their nitrogen in slow-release form.
  • Mow common Bermudagrass at 1 V2 inches and St. Augustine grass at 2W inches. Frequent mowing will keep an established lawn thick and healthy; but avoid removing more than one-third of the leaf surface each time.
  • Fertilize roses every 4 to 6 weeks from now to September. Start with a balanced fertilizer, then apply ammonium sulfate or other high-nitrogen fertilizer as new growth appears following a flowering cycle.

Garden Watch

  • Check new plant growth for aphids. A few can be tolerated, but large numbers should be controlled. Washing them off with a strong spray of water may be all that is necessary for adequate control.
  • Eliminate fire ants in your landscape by broadcasting labeled bait while temperatures are between 70 and 90 degrees. If fire ants are still present after using bait, treat the individual mounds with an appropriate insecticide. Contact the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service – Titus County at 903-572-0261 for more information.
  • Watch for rose rosette virus. New growth on diseased roses exhibit elongated/enlarged canes, reddish leaves and stems, and excessive thorns. Remove and destroy infected plants and roots immediately. There is no control for this fatal disease.
  • Soil purchased for use in beds, low areas and containers should be examined closely. Often, nutsedge and other weeds are brought into the yard through contaminated soil sources. Watch newspapers and other media for information regarding wildflower trails, garden tours and plant sales.

 
 
 

The Texas Redbud is a small, deciduous tree reaching a height of 15-20 feet and a width of 15-20 feet. The Texas Redbud will tolerate full to partial sun with medium water requirements. This Texas native produces pink to magenta flowers in early spring with attractive seed pods to follow. The Texas Redbud can be short lived often due to stem cankers.

Asterisk (*) means transplant vegetable starter plants. For
seeds, start 2-3 weeks earlier
Crop Spring
Planting Date
Fall
Planting Date
Seed or Plants
Per 100 ft of Row
Inches
Between
Number of
Days Before
Average Yield
Per 100 Feet
Average Days of Harvest
Asparagus 2/1 to 3/1 Not Rec. 1 ounce 18 730 30 pounds 60
Cabbage* 2/1 to 3/1 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 60 to 90 150 pounds 40
Garlic 2/1 to 3/1 9/1 to 10/15 1 pound 2 to 4 140 to 150 40 pounds
 
Kohlrabi 2/1 to 3/1 8/15 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 4 to 6 55 to 75 75 pounds 14
Onion (plants) 2/1 to 3/1 Not Rec. 400 to 600 plants 2 to 3 80 to 120 100 pounds 40
Peas, English 2/1 to 3/1 8/15 to 9/15 1 pound 1 55 to 90 20 pounds 7
Spinach 2/1 to 3/1 9/1 to 10/15 1 ounce 3 to 4 40 to 60 3 bushels 40
Turnip 2/1 to 3/1 9/15 to 10/15 1/2 ounce 2 to 3 30 to 60 75 pounds 35
Beets 2/1 to 4/1 9/1 to 10/1 1 ounce 2 50 to 60 150 pounds 30
Radish 2/1 to 4/1 9/15 to 10/15 1 ounce 1 25 to 40 100 bunches 7
Carrots 2/10 to 3/1 8/1 to 10/1 1/2 ounce 2 70 to 80 100 pounds 21
Collard / Kale 2/10 to 3/1 8/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 8 to 16 50 to 80 100 pounds 60
Potatoes, Irish 2/15 to 3/1 8/1 to 9/1 6 to 10 pounds 10 to 15 75 to 100 100 pounds
 
Cabbage, Chinese * 2/15 to 3/10 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 8 to 12 65 to 70 80 pounds 21
Lettuce 2/15 to 3/15 9/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 2 to 3 40 to 80 50 pounds 21
Broccoli * 3/1 to 3/15 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 60 to 80 100 pounds 40
Cauliflower * 3/1 to 3/15 8/1 to 9/15 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 70 to 90 100 pounds 14
Muskmelon 3/15 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 36 85 to 100 100 fruit 30
Chard, Swiss 3/20 to 4/15 8/1 to 10/1 2 ounces 6 45 to 55 75 pounds 40
Squash, Summer 3/20 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/15 1 ounce 18 to 36 50 to 60 150 pounds 40
Cucumber 4/1 to 4/15 8/1 to 9/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 28 50 to 70 120 pounds 30
Eggplant * 4/1 to 4/15 7/15 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 24 80 to 90 100 pounds 90
Squash, Winter 4/1 to 4/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 24 to 48 85 to 100 100 pounds
 
Tomato (plants) 4/1 to 4/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 36 70 to 90 100 pounds 40
Beans, Bush 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/2 pound 3 to 4 45 to 60 120 pounds 14
Beans, Pole 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/2 pound 4 to 6 60 to 70 150 pounds 30
Beans, Lima 4/1 to 5/1 8/1 to 8/15 1/4 pound 3 to 4 80 50 pounds 40
Corn, Sweet 4/1 to 5/1 7/15 to 8/1 3 to 4 ounces 12 to 18 70 to 90 10 dozen ears 10
Mustard 4/1 to 5/1 7/10 to 9/1 1/4 ounce 6 to 12 30 to 40 100 pounds 30
Potatoes, Sweet 4/1 to 5/15 Not Rec. 75 to 100 plants 12 to 16 100 to 130 100 pounds
 
Watermelon 4/1 to 5/15 7/1 to 7/15 1/2 ounce 36 to 96 80 to 100 40 fruits 30
Pepper 4/10 to 5/1 7/1 to 8/1 1/8 ounce 18 to 24 60 to 90 60 pounds 90
Pumpkin 4/15 to 5/15 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 ounce 36 to 48 75 to 100 100 pounds
 
Peas, Southern 4/15 to 6/1 7/1 to 8/1 1/2 pound 4 to 6 60 to 70 40 pounds 30
Watermelon 4/15 to 6/1 7/1 to 7/15 1/2 ounce 36 to 96 75 to 100 40 fruits 30
Okra 4/15 to 7/1 Not Rec. 2 ounces 24 55 to 65 100 pounds 90
Brussel Sprouts Not Rec. 8/1 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 14 to 24 90 to 100 75 pounds 21
Parsley Not Rec. 8/10 to 10/1 1/4 ounce 2 to 4 70 to 90 30 pounds 90

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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